Wedding Videography in the Digital Age | Wedding

What’s the state of the wedding videography industry today? To find out, we talked with working wedding videographers, found industry statistics and fleshed out what is undoubtedly a flourishing business in a growing market. Although some might wonder if amateurs are moving in on the pros because of lower-cost gear and easier-to-use software, our consensus of wedding shooters and editors say that isn’t so. We also took a look at the tools wedding videographers are using, and found out how the best wedding videographers are using the Web to open up new avenues of business for their bustling enterprises.To get an idea of the size of the wedding videography market, first let’s take a look at statistics that reveal the enormous amount of money spent on weddings in the United States. According to the American Wedding Study by Conde Nast’s Bridal Infobank, in the last ten years spending on an average wedding has exploded by 50%, to an average of $22,360 per wedding this year, up from $15,208 in 1994. And, according to Richard Markel, President of the Association for Wedding Professionals International, of the $65 billion spent on weddings each year, “6% of the budget would be for video.” Markel added, “But using the 6% of the estimated $65 billion spent will equate out to $390 million.” This signals a wide-open market for wedding videography professionals. Markel continued, “We just had a show here in Sacramento and several of our videographers booked business with an average ticket price of $2,500.”AdvertisementLooking at those stats, wedding videography appears to be a growth industry. Let’s do the math for a moment. Consider an experienced videographer , charging $2500 for an average wedding, shooting one wedding per week. In a year, that person has earned $130,000. But that would be a very hard-working videographer — most of the videographers we talked to said they spent up to 40 hours editing each wedding video, meaning a weekly shoot would constitute nearly-constant travail with hardly any time off.One great success story would be that of high-end videographer Kris Malandruccolo, whose company Elegant Videos by Kris has been operating in the Chicago area for the past 16 years. Her business can command as much as $5000 for a wedding video package, and regularly signs contracts for $3000 weddings. But the mother of three doesn’t want to work all the time, so she limits herself. “Someone else could shoot four or five per month. But I average two or three weddings a month,” she told Digital Media Net.According to Luisa Winters, an award-winning videographer and editor who has her own wedding videography business, Unforgettable Events, most wedding videographers charge under $2000 for their services — with higher-end wedding video companies charging as much as $15,000-$20,000. “I do not consider anyone a true professional unless they are able to make enough money to support themselves with this business,” Winters told Digital Media Net. “Anything else is a side business. Supporting a family means different things depending on what part of the country you are located. If you are in a less expensive location, then less income will suffice — and you are still professional,” Winters added.At prices of $2000-$5000 and up, it seems like amateurs would be interested in shooting their own wedding videos, or getting a friend or relative to take the controls of the family camcorder . But Internet message boards for wedding videographers are rife with stories of first-time videographers shooting an entire wedding ceremony with the camcorder on pause, only to find they began rolling after all was said and done, ending up with lots of artistic shots of the floor and nothing else. According to videographer /editor Luisa Winters, “The amateurs are taking a bite out of the wedding videographer business, but that is true only for the lower-end videographers.” She thinks the lower-end shooters make things better for the higher end, increasing the quality gap between the two. “More-educated brides will expect to pay a lot more for a video that looks professional than they were willing to pay before the advent of such inexpensive equipment. The difference between an amateur wedding video and a professional one is huge, and people are willing to pay Top Dollar for the latter.” Sometimes quality considerations can be quite basic, such as, can you hear what the bride and groom are saying? “You really have to worry about the audio part of it, you know. There’s a lot involved,” said Kris Malandruccolo, who in addition to being a successful wedding videographer is president of the Illinois Videographers Association.


Is the playing field being leveled by the profusion of low-cost, high quality equipment? According to Winters, “The quality of image and editing capabilities has become less important to the fact that now you have to be a better storyteller, you have to be a better artist… after all, we all have access to pen and paper, but we cannot all write the great American novel, right? Shakespeare and Mozart only had pen and paper to work with, and yet they gave us masterpieces that transcend time. Not all is determined by equipment.”Then there’s the editing, which is a process many newlyweds aren’t equipped to handle. “As you know, anyone in the business who edits knows it’s a time-consuming process,” said Malandruccolo. “I take tons of family videos but none of my personal stuff is edited, because there’s no time. So if I wasn’t getting paid, then I would not be editing, because it’s so time-consuming, especially if you don’t do it all the time. I think a lot of people, especially if they have the money, just want to say ‘do it for me.’” Malandruccolo added that it’s not just the time element that is a barrier to entry, but it’s the professionalism required to create a polished production. “The end result is that you have a better quality video. Like I emphasize to my clients, this is a family heirloom. You only get one shot to do it right, and you can’t do it over, so being that this is a family heirloom, if you look at it that way, then they’re willing to invest the money into it. And I’ve never had a client say that they’re sorry that they spent the money on video. Clients just don’t say that,” added Malandruccolo.Wedding videography has changed significantly over the past 20 years, where digital video shooting and editing has brought highly sophisticated techniques to a type of video production that was once quite basic. In those days it was typical to spend about $1000 on a video that was a simple, point-and-shoot production, with all the editing taking place in the camera . But now, with the power of digital technology, videographers are taking advantage of 3-chip DV camcorders and sophisticated editing setups, resulting in extraordinary productions, many of which are true works of art.For the shooting tasks, most wedding videographers use DV camcorders in the league of the Sony PD150 or VX 2000, Canon XL1 and GL2, or Panasonic 3-chip camcorders such as the AG-DVX100. Said Winters, “Most wedding videographers will use DV for acquisition (3-CCD), which is logical, because the cost is low, the quality is high, and above all, the weight of the camcorder is so low now, that videographers are able to be more creative with the smaller units than they were able to be, say, five or six years ago, when the cameras where huge. No longer do you have to have a big professional-looking camcorder to get good money videotaping weddings. In fact, many clients prefer the smaller units over the bigger ones, because they are less obtrusive.”Another staple of wedding coverage are wireless microphones, usually attached to the groom and strategically placed elsewhere, assuring that the most important words many people will ever speak will be clearly heard on the final product.The biggest technological leap has been in editing, where even unsophisticated computers can create presentations that would have been possible only in a multi-million dollar edit suite 20 years ago. Apple Final Cut Pro is the most popular Mac application for editing, with Adobe Premiere Pro 1.5 leading the pack on the Windows side. Other wedding videographers use Sony Vegas, Pinnacle Liquid Edition , Avid Xpress , NewTek Video Toaster, Canopus Edius and others. Some videographers opt for real-time DV acceleration cards such as the RT.X100 from Matrox or the DVStorm2 from Canopus . One constant is obvious throughout the equipment decision arena — people are staunchly devoted to the choices they’ve made. Winters said, “They’re loyal, from fierce arguments about the superiority of an operating system or capture card to the inferiority of the competing product. My personal opinion is less partisan. To me an editing system is a tool and nothing more — whatever works and makes me money is what I will use — and in this case I have chosen Premiere Pro 1.5 and a Matrox RT.X100 capture card. I have both the real time card from Matrox and plain generic FireWire cards.”Another popular technique of today’s wedding videography is multicamera production. At its most rudimentary level, a videographer will operate one camcorder while a second unmanned camcorder is set up on a tripod, taping the event from a different angle. For the reception, most of the time a single camcorder does all the shooting, with the other used as a backup. At its most sophisticated, a multicamera setup works in much the same way a network remote production would be configured, with multiple cameras attached to a switcher located in a separate room outside the venue. A director is in constant contact with each of the three, four or more camera operators via headsets, coordinating their shots while switching live between cameras while rolling tape in each camera for isolated footage that can be added in post.Advanced technology also makes the final product delivered to clients much better, where a high quality DVD is now commonly handed to the client when all the shooting and editing is done. Formerly an extra-cost option for wedding video clients, DVDs have been working their way into the mainstream particularly over the past few years. Said Malandruccolo, “When I first started offering DVDs about three years ago, they were expensive. I had it as an add-on. Not everyone took it because not everyone had a DVD player. It’s amazing how quickly that has changed, because now a lot of couples aren’t even interested in a VHS copy except for Grandma.” It’s not surprising that DVDs have taken over as far as deliverables are concerned. With home DVD player prices now dipping below $50, and many computers including DVD burners and players as standard equipment, DVDs have become a ubiquitous delivery medium for videographers of all kinds. Perhaps the greatest benefit of this is the fact that finally clients can see the true quality of the video, virtually the same as the quality of the camcorder on which it was shot. That represents quite a quality difference from the VHS tapes that were the norm just a few short years ago. “So many times, I was shooting with a 3-chip camcorder , and I would have this beautiful miniDV master, but then the couple’s walking out the door with VHS and I’m putting the master tape in a box in my studio. All that quality would go to waste,” said Malandruccolo.Every wedding videographer is intensely concerned with marketing, and high technology has been a boon to all involved. The biggest plus is the Web, with its ability to bring a tremendous volume of information to anyone with a computer. By far the most important innovation for wedding videography marketing is streaming video. Some reported to us that clients will not consider a videographer unless they can see a streaming video demo of the shooter’s work on the Web. Where in years past a client would need to personally visit numerous videographers to see examples of their work, now a bride-to-be can visit twenty Web sites in an evening, picking a videographer whose style and pricing matches her taste and budget. Streaming video is also important after the wedding is shot as well. According to Richard Markel, President of the Association for Wedding Professionals International, streaming video lets clients show their wedding to the world. “The ability to email or add streaming video to a Web site is awesome — now viewers that could not attend the wedding from around the world — friends and family — can view the wedding wherever they are,” Markel said.The Web has become so important on wedding marketing, that some videographers report a full 50% of their business is attracted via the Web. Clients can see the demo videos, get a price quote, and negotiate the entire shoot without ever seeing the videographer . “A lot of brides complement my Web site,” said Malandruccolo, because they get the instant gratification of seeing samples immediately. “The majority have broadband connections so they can see the sample videos of past projects. I’ve booked brides without even meeting with them, just from them finding my Web site, clicking on the streaming video, calling me, talking price, and they’ll say, ‘All right. Send me a contract.’ I feel if you’re a videographer , if you want to get more business, you need to offer streaming video.”


However, the Web isn’t the only way to drum up business. As it has always been, another important tool is referrals, that age-old kind of word-of-mouth advertising where happy customers report their positive (or negative) wedding video results to others looking for the same service. Videographers such as Luisa Winters of Unforgettable Events see the Web as more of a reinforcement tool for referrals than an end-all. “The Web is great, but it is just a means of reinforcing what they have heard already through the referral, or if they are just surfing the net,” she said. According to Winters, “By far, most clientele comes to us resulting from referrals from brides and other vendors — in fact, we do not advertise at all.” Surprisingly, she sees other wedding vendors as her allies, even if they are competing wedding videographers. “Many times my referrals come from other videographers that just cannot do the job for whatever reason — mostly because they are already busy. Referrals, referrals, referrals — that’s the way to go!”Attending a bridal show is another way for videographers to get the word out about their services. Brides-to-be attend these shows to see new trends and pick up ideas, and the number of videographers showing their wares at such events has increased over the years. According to Markel, “I have had videographers in my consumer bridal show over the last 15 years, however it was only one or two at most per show. But that’s changing fast — last week at our show we had 11.” There are also exhibitions that are held specifically for wedding videographers, the biggest being the annual event held by WEVA, the Wedding and Event Videographers Association.Another powerful way to attract attention to a videography business is by advertising in bridal publications. That’s why Illinois Videographers Association president Kris Malandruccolo says it’s a big advantage to be a part of an organization where videographers can band together. “We took out a co-op ad in Chicago Wedding Pages magazine and Wedding Guide Chicago, and in order to be on that co-op ad, you have to be a member of IVA. So we’re able to advertise in magazines for less cost, because we’re all going in on the ads.” But even though Luisa Winters thinks ads are important, she adds that there’s more to it than that. “He or she who markets best, wins,” asserted Winters. “And notice that marketing is not only placing ads, it is building those relationships in the wedding business which will lead to referrals — that is the marketing that counts the most.”All the wedding videographers interviewed were certain that amateurs are not overrunning their businesses in any significant way, although there were numerous examples of “newbies” who made valiant attempts but found out — often too late — that pro-level videography isn’t as easy as it looks. Even though equipment prices and easy-to-use editing software has brought video-making into the mainstream, talent and experience, as well as hard work and shrewd marketing are still scarce qualities that make professional wedding videographers a valuable resource to the multi-billion dollar wedding industry.

Wedding Customs & Traditions and Their Place in Modern Weddings | Wedding

A wedding ceremony occurs when a bride and a groom solemnly pledge themselves to one another for a lifetime, some say for eternity, in the presence of friends and family.Celebrated today, as it has been throughout history, even to Biblical days, marriage and a wedding have been considered a sacred and solemn yet happiest event. Every culture considers a wedding, when the bride and groom enter their marriage as two individuals and becoming inextricably a part of each other, creating a new family, as the highest of all celebrations.As the saying goes, Love makes the world go around.Most cultures celebrate the love, devotion and commitment called wedding, with unique customs and traditions. Because the wedding is a wonderful and touching event, brides and grooms want both ceremony and reception to be personalized and unique to them. Thus, they look for meaningful experiences and often adopt customs and traditions of cultures other than their own.The USA and recently to many other countries have become homes to people from all over the world. These people enrich the cultures with their Old Country customs, traditions and cuisine. Some traditions have become an integral pare of the modern wedding ceremony and reception.Aisle RunnerThe white aisle runner, signifies purity and a pathway into happiness. Sprinkled with rose petals the bride’s path lead her to a sweet and happy future.BibleIn many cultures, and religions it is traditional to give the bride and groom a keepsake bible as a wedding gift. It is also considered important that the bride carry one to the wedding ceremony to signify God as witnessing and blessing the marriage.Blue – Something BlueIn ancient Israel, brides wore a blue ribbon to signify love, modesty, purity and fidelity.Brides in many Latin-American countries wear a light blue slip beneath their dresses.Bread, Salt and Wine CeremonyAn Eastern European tradition calls for the bride and groom to partake in bread sprinkled with salt and drink a sip of wine.The interesting thing about this custom is that different cultures have different interpretations. So while according to Polish tradition the symbolism of the bread is hope that the couple will never go hungry, the salt that life will have its difficulties, and the wine is a blessing for health and happiness, – in Lithuanian tradition the symbolism of the bread is hard work, the salt tears and the wine joy. bridal BouquetWedding bouquets were originally made of such strong herbs as thyme and garlic, which were meant to frighten away evil spirits. Today most couples opt for flowers either because they are favorites, have special meaning or are in their wedding colors.


Bridal HandkerchiefEarly farmers thought a bride’s wedding tears were lucky and brought them rain for their crops. Later on in history, a crying bride meant that she would never shed another tear about her marriage. Today, the handkerchief that dabs away the tears of wedding joy and happiness is kept as a family heirloom, often in a frame or shadow box, until it is lovingly passed down from mother to daughter or to future daughter in law to use on her special day. She in turn is expected to continue the family tradition and pass it down to the next generation.In Belgium, the family of the bride takes a handkerchief embroidered with the bride’s name to the wedding. After the event, the handkerchief is displayed proudly in the family’s home. As subsequent daughters in the family marry, their names are added and then displayed.In Switzerland, junior bridesmaids carry colored hankies. Guests may “buy” the handkerchiefs by contributing a money to the couples “nest egg.”Bridal Shower
Prior to the wedding itself, it is traditional for the Maid of Honor to throw a bridal shower as part of the bridal ceremonies.It is customary to give the bride gifts to be used at the wedding such as wedding accessories, decorations, pew bows – bridal chairs decorations, gig type gifts of a humorous nature, gifts to use on the honeymoon.Bridal Car Cans Tied To The Bumper and – or Honking the HornOne of the Middle Ages wedding traditions was to bang pots, ring cowbells and generally make a lot of disturbing noise after the marriage ceremony in order to ward off evil spirits. This custom has been replaced with tying tin cans to the bumper of the car transporting the bride and groom and or and or honking horns at it while following the bridal procession to the reception to announce the marriage.Shoes on the Bumper:Either combined with the cans or on its own, the custom of Tying shoes to the bumper of the car has become quite popular.The shoes reflect a rather ancient tradition.In ancient Egypt it was customary for the father of the bride, that as he gave his consent allowing the groom to marry his daughter, he would also give him the bride’s sandals to show that she once married she belonged to him.GarterToday, many brides will wear two garters. The garter that coordinates with her wedding accessories will become a wedding keepsake and another, a Tossing Garter, to be tossed to be retrieved by one of the single men in attendance.Garter PouchAnother lesser-known Victorian wedding tradition involved small bags with a bit of bread, cloth, wood and a coin to protect the new family against shortages of food, clothing, shelter and money. Add a lump of sugar to bring them sweetness all their married life.IvyIvy symbolizes eternal fidelity & wedded bliss.A popular
Victorian tradition was for a bride to plant the ivy in her bouquet after the wedding
and watch it grow through the years, passing down sprigs from the same plant for
her daughters & granddaughters to use in their weddings.Money DanceOriginating from most European countries, the Money Dance has become so popular across all weddings that a special Purse – Money Bag is one of the items present with the wedding accessories collection. Called in the USA the Dollar Dance, is where male guests “pay” to dance with the bride. Various methods are used by different cultures. In some, the bride carries a Purse and the dancers place monetary bills in it, in others the dancers pin the bills on the wedding gown, yet in others, the maid of honor wears an apron and collects the money given by the guests to dance with the bride. In all traditions, the guests are expected to be generous when “paying” for a dance with the bride. since the money collected is to be used by the newly weds on their honeymoon and for setting a household.The money dance is so widely accepted as an integral part of a wedding, that most guests anticipate that it will be included in the celebration providing a way for brides and grooms to generate cash without requesting or even suggesting money as wedding gifts.NOTE: We at A-wedding Day have received many inquiries regarding the proper way to ask wedding guests to give money instead of gifts. The answer to ALL was the same. There is NO proper way. It is tacky if and in bad taste. DO NOT do it!!! Ribbon PullA wedding event called a “ribbon pull” is traditional to Victorian weddings. A charm is purchased for each of the bridesmaids and engraved with a wish for the future. Each charm is tied to a ribbon or a silver necklace chain. The charms are places between layers of the wedding cake as it is being assembled. Just Before the bride and groom share the first slice of cake, the bridesmaids gather so that each can pull one ribbon, claiming a “ribbon pull” that holds the promise of her future. Today, many couples offer the Ribbon pull with the rehearsal dinner cake, so the bridesmaids may wear the charms at the wedding.Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue, Lucky Sixpence


Something Old – Signifies a sense of continuity, tradition and represents the link to the bride’s old life and her family.Something New – Signifies the couple’s new beginning, new life together as well as their hope for the future.Something Borrowed – Borrow something from a happily married friend or family. To wish you that your married life will mirror the happiness in her marriage, Brides can borrow Jewelry or a handkerchief from a family member or close friend.Something Blue – Blue represents fidelity, love, and purity.Lucky Sixpence in her shoe- Signifies wealth both financial wealth and a wealth of happiness and joy. This is an ancient custom to appease Diana, goddess of chastity and unmarried maidens, so that the bride could lose her virginity and bear children. A lucky sixpence in your shoe will bring a life of fortune. The sixpence first became known as a lucky coin then introduced by king Edward VI of England in 1551 and later became part of bridal wedding traditions in the Victorian era.Wedding RingWe hear of wedding ring as early as the Bible. When Abraham sent his servant to bring a wife for his son Isaac, the servant gave her a gold ring and bracelets as he asked her to accompany him and marry Isaac.By its round shape, the wedding ring symbolizes the circle of life and its wholeness and since it has neither beginning nor end, undying, unending love. The metal symbolizes the permanence of marriage while gold with it’s lasting qualities stands for beauty and purity.In Jewish tradition, the ring must be plain with no stones and must belong to the groom.Unity Candles
The ever popular Unity Candle ceremony might have originated in the Philippine Islands. A part of their wedding ceremony presents a set of three candles. The bride lights one candle, the groom lights another, and together the bride and groom light the Unity Candle that signifies their union as husband and wife. Actually the Unity Candle ceremony in the USA took on an additional aspect. The candle not only unites the bride and groom, but their families as well. This is why it is customary to have the mother of the bride, not the bride, light one candle, the mother of the groom lights another, and the bride and groom light the Unity Candle itself. The Unity candle has a very profound meaning for blending family where each child lights a taper candle to signify the new blended family.

Wedding Planning: Tips for Choosing Online Wedding Vendors | Wedding

If you’re looking to the internet for help with your wedding plans, you’re sure to benefit from the wealth of organizational and comprehensive wedding tips, ideas, tools and resources available right at your fingertips! The internet is packed with useful websites, as well as online stores offering every wedding product and service imaginable. You’ll find everything from wedding invitations, wedding keepsakes and wedding favors to online bridal gift registries, travel agencies for destination weddings and honeymoons, wedding consulting services and much more. To ensure that you can recognize and hire or purchase from qualified wedding vendors, the key is to be aware of a few general guidelines.First, it’s important to understand the two basic kinds of online wedding vendors with whom you may choose to do business with.Wedding Vendor Type 1) An actual, physical storefront who opts to have a website to further broaden their customer base and supplement their offline business.+ Possible benefits of this type of wedding vendor: This is a wonderful opportunity for you, as you may familiarize yourself with the wedding vendor’s offerings via their website and then choose to drop by their store to have a look around and complete your purchase in person. Or you may do this vice-versa – have a look around their store and then go online to make your purchase. This is a very flexible consumer environment for you, as there can be multiple sources of contact and convenient ways to browse! You can also get a personal feel for the type and level of service you may expect from the wedding vendor and their staff.- Possible drawbacks to this type of wedding vendor: Though not true or hard to measure in many cases, the wedding vendor with a physical storefront does have the potential to be more expensive. And though the storefront exists, it may not be within reasonable driving distance for you to visit in person and explore.


Wedding Vendor Type 2) A virtual store who deals exclusively online.+ Possible benefits of this type of wedding vendor: You’ll often find a reasonable value for your dollar here, as in many cases, online wedding vendors tend to have lower overhead. As well, take advantage of shopping anytime you feel like it…even if it’s the middle of the night!- Possible drawbacks to this type of wedding vendor: In general, you will never actually meet the wedding vendor with whom you are entrusting a certain aspect of your wedding to. To some brides and grooms, this may be worry-some, for others, not a big deal. Do what feels right for you, as this issue may be dependent upon what item or area of your wedding you are shopping for.What to Look for in an Online Wedding Vendor:

Quality and selection: Look around the website to gain a sense of the overall image of the wedding vendor or their company as a whole. What general impression do you get from the products or services offered? What about the tone, variety and general appearance of the website? As with offline wedding vendors, first impressions speak volumes online.

If applicable, browse through photographs, screenshots, detailed spec lists, virtual tours and any other information provided. When dealing with products specifically, many websites display close-up versions of product pictures, which accurately showcase items from several different angles or viewing points.

Availability and delivery: Check into shipping rates and time frames for delivery, as well as possible limitations/restrictions of service in your area of residence. In regards to products, ensure that you are aware of shipping cost variations for items exceeding a certain weight, or oppositely, any shipping discount awarded for purchases in large quantities, such as wedding favors.

Physical address or mailing location: Many wedding vendors are eager to supply this information to give customers a sense of security that they’re a dependable and trustworthy “real” business.

Methods of contact: Wedding vendors want to communicate with you! Quality wedding professionals look forward to meeting your needs and usually provide several means of communication. Look for email addresses, online forms or phone numbers. Some wedding websites even provide a “Live Help” button with which you can carry out a real-time conversation with a staff member. In addition to giving you many options for contact, many online wedding vendors also have a “Frequently Asked Questions” page on their website that may be of some assistance to you. Often, common questions are outlined and explained for immediate answers.

Helpful suggestions or advice: Not to be confused with the above point! While a wedding vendor may offer open lines of communication with you, they must follow through on it! Keep an eye out for their attitude toward you. Was their response to your inquiry prompt? Enthusiastic? Informative? Look for a willingness from the wedding vendor to answer your questions, provide details and offer you suggestions. See if they have an overall positive attitude toward you and about your wedding, as well as toward their business in general.

Experience: Wedding vendors want to prove that they are trustworthy and reliable! Check out the wedding vendor’s “Testimonials” or “Reviews” web page. See what other brides and grooms have had to say about their experience with this wedding vendor’s product or service. If available, check out their “Press” section to see what media coverage they have experienced and for what reasons. Look for a wedding vendor who takes pride in what they do and in the level of service they provide to their clients.

Take it a step further and type the appropriate business name or web address into your search engine of choice to spend at least a few minutes paging through the search results on a particular wedding vendor before buying. You may find articles and press releases about the wedding vendor. Even more helpful: you may come across forums or other valuable feedback from brides and grooms who have personally dealt with the wedding vendor.

Free sample or trial options: With wedding products, many online wedding vendors get your attention by offering a free sample of their wares. For example, a wedding stationery store may offer to mail a sample invitation kit mailed right to your door so you can see the quality of the cardstock and design in person. With wedding services, many online wedding vendors may offer a free trial option. For example, a guest list software company may offer a trial version or time period for you to check out their system and see how easy it is to use. Often, if a wedding service provider does not offer a free trial, they will provide screenshots or an online tour for you to experience a “sneak peek” of their services. If no sample or trial options are available, see what money-back guarantees or refund policies are in place.

Secure payment options: Many online wedding vendors accommodate with several payment options for your convenience. Some process credit cards directly on their website, or through a third party website. You may also have the option to mail in a personal check or money order. Please be advised that this could delay processing and shipping until payment is received by the company. It may require longer, more flexible timelines on your part, often by one week to 10 days.


Keep these general guidelines in mind while shopping online for your wedding, and you’ll be ready to make smart, conscientious decisions. When you choose to be informed and aware, you possess savvy online shopper skills that enable you to make the best wedding product or service purchases for you and your dream wedding!